Setting the record straight on Elvis Presley and racism, Part 2

Elvis Presley (Photo graphic Texas Elvis Fan Club archives)

 

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Elvis Presley (Photo: Texas Elvis Fan Club archives)

NEWS LEGIT presents Part 2 of “Setting the record straight on Elvis Presley and racism.” (See Part 1 here). Young music and entertainment history buffs have succumbed to slanted news of Presley being racist. We reached out to three experts on the topic to set the record straight. Their cumulative research represents over 80 years of study, exploration and documentation in the field of culture, music history and Elvis Presley. These specialists are:

 

  • Guillermo F. Perez-Argüello (GPA) is a former Nicaraguan diplomat and UN staff member, graduated from Holy Cross then Oxford University and is a binational of both Peru and Nicaragua. He was a musician and singer with Los Hang Ten’ s, a Peruvian mid-1960’s rock group.
  • Craig Philo (CP) is a music researcher and historian from Sheppey, in Kent, U.K.
  • Jay Viviano (JP) is a pop culture historian with over 20 years of experience in research of icons of the 50’s and 60’s, with a strong concentration on Blues artists.

 

CP: “In all my time on researching Elvis Aaron Presley I have never ever once come across any racial behavior or activity. Indeed the only stuff you will find was a slanderous lie that’s gathered mythical proportions through the years originally reported by Sepia magazine in April of 1957 and consequently torn to shreds by none other than the great Louie Robinson of Jet Magazine.”

GPA: “In fact Louis Robinson, the talented African American writer who Jet Magazine commissioned to go to LA and interview Presley on the MGM set of “Jailhouse Rock”, in 1957, to obtain his views on racist and other “copycat” remarks which appeared in SEPIA, a magazine geared towards the African American market in the US South. But unlike Jet and Ebony, it was owned by white anti-integrationist and based in Fort Worth, TX.

Jailhouse Rock, 1957 (Photo: Texas Elvis Fan Club archives)

Robinson has just passed away. He unequivocally stated the rumors were false, so this mentioning of Presley as one who stole, or copied, from African Americans and coming from a prestigious magazine as Ebony tells me (that any writer who differs), well how can I put this, is ill informed.”

JV: “The truth though, which stands up to scrutiny, is that there simply was no other white man as famous as Elvis back in those days that took so many hits for proudly befriending the black community.
The ridiculous fact that people try to spread the opposite as ‘some sort of truth’ makes it paramount that this is handled aggressively.”

‘Presley set an example of wholesome Brotherhood. I find something to admire in Presley and that is his attitude on the racial issue.” –Reverend Milton Perry

CP: “When actor Sidney Poitier and tennis great Arthur Ashe wanted to write books, they sought Mr. Robinson’s help. ‘Never in my life have I known a better man,’ Poitier said. Yes, Robinson went and interviewed Elvis on the set of Jailhouse Rock. The fact Presley was never in Boston when the quote was reputedly made matters little to some. It was and remains a vicious lie concocted by a fearful white middle America as a weapon to try and cut down this brave and carefree spirited individual whose only crime was to record the music he loved and respected. And at all times in doing so paid reverence and respect to those black artists that he deemed did it better than he did. After all, there is no color in music!”

JV: “People need to get over their ignorance about American history. Elvis did himself NO favors back then by hanging out and letting himself be photographed with black folks. Racism was a common blatant practice of the day. It was these very things that made Elvis hated by many older white folks, yet respected by the black community.

Reverend Milton Perry concluded his statement by saying ‘Presley set an example of wholesome Brotherhood. I find something to admire in Presley and that is his attitude on the racial issue. And that it would be good if other people in the South in other parts of the nation emulated his attitude’.”

GPA: “Notice that, in the US, of all the early Blues, Country and Western, Gospel and R&B masters, the ones who sprang from them, namely Elvis Presley, Fats Domino, Chuck Berry, Bo Diddley, Bill Haley, Little Richard and Ray Charles, let alone the ones who sprang from or appeared in the scene IMMEDIATELEY after them; namely Johnny Cash, Roy Orbison, Ricky Nelson, Buddy Holly, Carl Perkins, Jerry Lee Lewis, Gene Vincent and say Eddie Cochran, the only one whose MUSICAL palette was totally complete was Elvis Presley.

Elvis swoons fans at Hudson Theater, Jul 1, 1956 (Texas Elvis Fan Club archives)

Otherwise, how can one explain that the top singer in the world, on December 4, 1956, should start, the guitar now firmly in his arms, the so called Million Dollar Quartet session with an Agustin Lara song from 1941, the classic “Solamente una vez?” Only Elvis, in this case with (his mother) Gladys’ music taste’s help, was destined to rule.”

Setting the record straight on Elvis Presley and racism, Part 1 

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